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Ishikari-No-Hama
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Co., Ltd. Koki Sapporo Plant
1-48, Hachiken 7-jo Nishi 11-chome, Nishi-ku, Sapporo City, Hokkaido, Japan

Category: Koji-zuke
Product Name: Ishikari-No-Hama
Raw Materials: chinese cabbage, red snapper, kelp, carrot, pickled ingredients (rice, rice malt, reduced water syrup, vinegar, spices, bonito mash extract, hydrolyzed protein, salt, amino acid solution), sorbitol, seasonings (amino acids, etc.), acidifiers (some ingredients include wheat, mackerel, soybeans, gelatin)

Ishikari-Zuke


Ishikari-Zuke is one of Hokkaido's most famous pickles, along with Matsumae pickles. Ishikari Nabe is similar to Ishikari Nabe, but it is a sake lees soup using sake lees, Chinese cabbage and salmon. It could be said that Ishikari-Zuke is the same recipe used to make pickled vegetables.

Ishikari-Zuke, a home-style dish, is a mixture of these basic ingredients and a variety of other things. However, the Ishikari-Zuke sold in supermarkets is sometimes a "pickle with scissors" with salmon, Chinese cabbage, kelp, carrots, etc. neatly piled up in layers.


So, I bought a product called Ishikari no Hama, which was sold as Ishikari-Zuke, pickled in koji. When I looked at it, I saw that it was very neatly made, with red salmon, blackish kelp, and carrots sandwiched among the Chinese cabbage. Trying that Chinese cabbage, hmm? It has a different taste from the salted Chinese cabbage. I wonder if this is the taste of koji pickles. When I tried to eat salmon next, this is not uncomfortable as a pickles, and it is good. As we proceeded to eat, we could feel the various flavors created by the kombu, salmon and other seasonings and never got tired of them. This is interesting. It's the perfect accompaniment to sake.

Since it's classified as as lightly pickled, I guess it can't be preserved so well. Well, if you open it, it will be gone that day~.

Ishikawa Prefecture has Kabura-zushi with turnip and yellowtail, but this combination of Chinese cabbage and salmon at Ishikari-Zuke in Hokkaido is quite interesting.
©Japanese Famous Foods , Update:2020/06/04